The transformative impact of intentional Community

Event date: Wed. Nov. 18, 2020

Join others to view a prerecorded webchat discussion with Sky Blue and Avi Kruley on the potential of intentional communities to help transform our world.

Humanity is in crisis. The feedback loop between larger society, the communities we live in, and our personal experiences reinforce systems of privilege and oppression that create harm – for people and the planet.

From the safety of your home*, learn what makes a group an intentional community. Are intentional communities part of the problem or part of the solution? How can we do better? This conversation between Sky and Avi will delve into these multifaceted experiments known as intentional communities and their potential to help transform our world.

Register now to view this prerecorded discussion made available through our national cohousing information source, Coho USA.

Head shots of featured speakers Avi Kurley and Sky Blue.
Avi Kruley, Community Wellbeing Facilitator at the Mount Madonna Center in Watsonville, CA, and Sky Blue, Executive Director of the Foundation for Intentional Community

Register in advance to join this special Zoom meeting.

Wednesday, November 18, 2020
7:00-8:00 P.M. Central Time (U.S. and Canada)
Free.

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting.

Cheerful diverse friends gathering in modern studio apartment suggestive of an intentional community.

* Due to COVID-19, Twin Cities Cohousing Network has shifted to holding virtual events that bring people together from the safety of their own homes.

Community + Privacy = Cohousing

Can we disrupt the isolation of modern life with a newer form? The word “cohousing” is translated from the Danish, where these clustered, intentional mini-communities are fairly common (and in fact are encouraged by government policies in Denmark).

What defines cohousing? There are some aspects that are bricks-and-mortar: each household owns its own private home–sometimes a detached house, more often a townhome or condo unit–and a share in the yard/gardens as well as a building for optional group meals and other activities, the “common house”.

It is the social aspects that disrupt our society’s typical way of life. People who live in cohousing do so with a commitment to building community among their neighbors, sharing some equipment (such as lawnmowers and snowblowers) that gets used infrequently, and helping each other.